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fastcompany:

Berg Explores The Future Of Touchable Movies

We think of movies as linear progressions. It’s generally a story with a beginning, middle, and end—and it’s always something we consume from start to finish. Timo Arnall of Berg shows us all just how dated this view of video has become. In a project for Bonnier and Mag+, which I’ve dubbed “cinema glass,” he turns a movie into a swipeable, interactive entity on a tablet. And I don’t just mean that you can pause it or fast forward in some clever way. I mean, 2-D frames combine to become something that feels different than anything we’ve seen before.

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Source: fastcodesign.com
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futurescope:

Fossil Free: Microbe Helps Convert Solar Power to Liquid Fuel

A new “bioreactor” could store electricity as liquid fuel with the help of a genetically engineered microbe and copious carbon dioxide. The idea—dubbed “electrofuels” by a federal agency funding the research—could offer electricity storage that would have the energy density of fuels such as gasoline. If it works, the hybrid bioelectric system would also offer a more efficient way of turning sunlight to fuel than growing plants and converting them into biofuel.

“The method provides a way to store electrical energy in a form that can be readily used as a transportation fuel,” chemical engineer James Liao of the University of California, Los Angeles, explains. Liao and his colleagues report on their “integrated electro-microbial bioreactor” in Science on March 30. […]

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Source: scientificamerican.com
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futurescope:

HexaPod by Kåre Halvorsen

It’s been awhile since we last saw Kåre Halvorsen’s morphing hexapod ball-shaped bot, and in the interim it picked up some new tricks. Before, the MorpHex could only maneuver by scurrying around on its six legs, but now it can move around while still in spherical form. It works by periodically protruding its polycarbonate panels to get rolling, and it stops and turns in similar fashion. 

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Source: Engadget
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futurescope:

Smart sand & robot pebbles

It sounds like something out of a fantasy film: a vat of sand into which you plunge a small object only to watch the sand bind together to form larger copies of the same object. Such “smart sand” isn’t exactly a reality just yet, but a team at MIT’s Distributed Robotics Laboratory (DRL) has a vision for tiny granules—“smart pebbles”—imbued with a small amount of computing power and covered in magnets on the outside. Piled together in a heap, the small amount of computing power in each grain would become a single distributed computing platform capable of shaping itself into objects, with the unneeded grains falling away to leave behind the finished product. […]

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Source: popsci.com
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xombiedirge:

Death Proof: Stuntman Mike by Guillermo Ariete

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Source: xombiedirge
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onlyideal:

Camera reconstructs object from scattered reflection of a laser’s photons and their delays, with picosecond accuracy, giving sub-mm reconstruction precision.

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Source: youtube.com
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gameraddictions:

galaxynextdoor:

Dragon’s Dogma preview

cannot wait for this

Source: galaxynextdoor
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futurescope:

Software Architecture for the Car of the Future

The global Siemens research department Corporate Technology is working with partners to develop new information and communications technology (ICT) for future electric cars. In vehicles built with this new technology, the driver assistance, safety, and infotainment features will mostly be installed as software instead of being managed in control units. This will reduce the current complexity of the ICT architecture and at the same time increase its power. The partners intend to demonstrate the benefits of a centralized ICT architecture with two electric car prototypes. The recently launched project RACE (Robust and Reliant Automotive Computing Environment for Future eCars) is scheduled to run for three years and is being funded by Germany’s Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology.

Today, drivers and vehicle occupants enjoy improved performance, comfort, and safety thanks to functions like the anti-lock braking system, Electronic Stability Program, active parking aid, emergency brake assistant, lane departure warning system, and proximity-controlled cruise control. However, the associated ICT that has grown up in vehicles over many years is becoming increasingly complex. This is making the introduction of new features increasingly labor-intensive and expensive. The individual components are connected with many different data transmission systems, for example. It is hardly possible to upgrade cars with new functions that weren’t built in to the vehicles during the initial manufacturing process. Electromobility offers the opportunity to rework the ICT architecture and to quickly integrate new functions. 

To this end, the partners want to bring together all the functions in a few central computers with a single bus system. The advantage here is that new systems would be installed via Plug&Play technology like on a PC - extra control units and wiring would no longer be necessary. The new architecture should also enable the vehicle to communicate with a future intelligent power grid and transport system and allow the development of completely new functions - such as an “autopilot” that could steer the vehicle autonomously in the distant future. 

The ICT architecture is being implemented in two electric cars. For the “Evolution” prototype, the researchers will replace the existing vehicle technology step-by-step with new components for features such as autonomous parking or inductive charging. The “Revolution” prototype is being newly designed from the ground up. The project partners are Siemens, TRW Automotive, AVL Software and Functions, fortiss, Institut ILS at the University of Stuttgart, the departments Software & Systems Engineering and Real-Time Computer Systems at the TU München, Fraunhofer Research Institution for Applied and Integrated Security (AISEC), and the RWTH Aachen (ACS/ISEA).

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Source: siemens.com